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Display a Personal Work Schedule in an Electronic Calendar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107811D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kucyi, HZ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When looking at an electronic calendar (be it PROFS*, OfficeVision*, DEC** All-In-One, etc.), one cannot tell what hours a person is customarily "at work" vs. "not at work" even though work hours are specified in a personal work schedule. (Not all people work 9 to 5. A person might be a supplemental employee who only works mornings, or someone might be in a different time zone and the time looked at on the calendar is actually night hours, or the person might work third shift.) It is important when scheduling meetings that the time selected is actually the time a person is at work, or, at a minimum, one needs to be able to know that a person is not at work during that period of time and that special arrangements need to be made.

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Display a Personal Work Schedule in an Electronic Calendar

       When looking at an electronic calendar (be it PROFS*,
OfficeVision*, DEC** All-In-One, etc.), one cannot tell what hours a
person is customarily "at work" vs. "not at work" even though work
hours are specified in a personal work schedule.  (Not all people
work 9 to 5.  A person might be a supplemental employee who only
works mornings, or someone might be in a different time zone and the
time looked at on the calendar is actually night hours, or the person
might work third shift.)  It is important when scheduling meetings
that the time selected is actually the time a person is at work, or,
at a minimum, one needs to be able to know that a person is not
at work during that period of time and that special arrangements need
to be made.

      Electronic calendars should provide the ability to visually
indicate a person's "personal work schedule" when displaying the
person's calendar.  The figure shows one method whereby this can be
accomplished by using shading to indicate those hours the person is
not at work.

      When looking at a calendar, a person will be able to tell at a
glance what times the user is available (at work) or unavailable (not
at work).  This will permit taking the appropriate action immediately
when scheduling meetings rather than having to wait for the person to
notify that the time selected is unsuitable.
*   Trademark of IBM Corp.
**  Trademark of Digital Equipment C...