Browse Prior Art Database

Liquid Crystal Display for Color Matching Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107828D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dove, DB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Desk top publishing has became a significant industry, based upon the use of the PC to carry out electronic page composition, so avoiding the traditional methods of cut and paste. A problem arises, however, in color page composition in matching the color on a display to the color of actual printed material, since the colors produced by displays have poor correspondence to the colors produced by printers inks, even though it is well know that, in principle, color matching may be achieved (within limits) by suitably modifying the mixing of colors of the display to match a color CIE or other specification. For this reason, colors are frequently matched by actually printing trial proofs and by repeated iterations until an acceptable hard copy is obtained.

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Liquid Crystal Display for Color Matching Applications

       Desk top publishing has became a significant industry,
based upon the use of the PC to carry out electronic page
composition, so avoiding the traditional methods of cut and paste.  A
problem arises, however, in color page composition in matching the
color on a display to the color of actual printed material, since the
colors produced by displays have poor correspondence to the colors
produced by printers inks, even though it is well know that, in
principle, color matching may be achieved (within limits) by suitably
modifying the mixing of colors of the display to match a color CIE or
other specification.  For this reason, colors are frequently matched
by actually printing trial proofs and by repeated iterations until an
acceptable hard copy is obtained.   We describe an improved display
in which the basic colors of the display may be matched to desired
press inks or other color sets.

      The major feature is the combination of a monochrome LCD panel
with external light sources coupled with a removable filter set.  The
panel does not contain internal filters; instead, color is achieved
by applying the color image information in such a way that all pixels
required for color 1 are activated while the panel is illuminated via
filter 1, the panel information is then changed to that for color 2
and filter 1 is replaced by filter 2 and so on for color 3.  This
sequence is carried out rapidly so that flicker is not objectionable.
Also, resolution is significantly improved compared with a typical
color panel since any pixel may be used for each color.  The panel
may be illuminated in a reflection mode or a transmission mode.

      An implementation of the above-described con...