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Method to Allow a Windows User to Use Extended ANSI Characters Supported by Windows when Specifying User IDs, Passwords or Domain Names to be Used on an OS/2 Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107833D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cheok, CK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Currently, if a user attempts to log on to an OS/2* network while running under Windows and the UserID, Password or Domain Name contains any extended characters (i.e., characters above HEX 80) the logon attempt will fail. The reason for this is because the characters that Windows uses are represented based on the ANSI character set while the characters that the OS/2 network uses are based on the supported OS/2 code page that the OS/2 network is currently running. Currently, the only characters that will be successful when logging on to an OS/2 network are characters below HEX 80 (i.e., characters such as a-z and A-Z).

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Method to Allow a Windows User to Use Extended ANSI Characters Supported by Windows when Specifying User IDs, Passwords or Domain Names to be Used on an OS/2 Network

       Currently, if a user attempts to log on to an OS/2*
network while running under Windows and the UserID, Password or
Domain Name contains any extended characters (i.e., characters above
HEX 80) the logon attempt will fail.  The reason for this is because
the characters that Windows uses are represented based on the ANSI
character set while the characters that the OS/2 network uses are
based on the supported OS/2 code page that the OS/2 network is
currently running.  Currently, the only characters that will be
successful when logging on to an OS/2 network are characters below
HEX 80 (i.e., characters such as a-z and A-Z).

      Obviously, the above situation is not desirable since extended
characters are used quite often in the United States and even more so
in foreign countries.  In order to get around the above limitation
the DOS LAN Requester Windows product makes use of conversion
routines which convert characters from the ANSI representation that
Windows supports into the correct representation for the OS/2 network
server code page.

      These conversion routines allow a Windows user to type in any
extended character that Windows supports when logging on.  The
characters that a user enters are then converted before being passed
across to the OS/2 server.  Since the characters have...