Browse Prior Art Database

Method to Allow a Windows User to Specify a Particular Domain when Attempting to Log On to an OS/2 Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107835D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haberski, MF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Currently, Windows does not have a domain concept when logging on a network. If a Windows user is also familiar with the IBM DOS LAN Requester and its concept of a network domain, then this fact could cause confusion. The IBM product DOS LAN Requester Windows will avoid this confusion by allowing a user to specify the domain in which they wish to log on to just like the current DOS LAN Requester does.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Method to Allow a Windows User to Specify a Particular Domain when Attempting to Log On to an OS/2 Network

       Currently, Windows does not have a domain concept when
logging on a network.  If a Windows user is also familiar with the
IBM DOS LAN Requester and its concept of a network domain, then this
fact could cause confusion.  The IBM product DOS LAN Requester
Windows will avoid this confusion by allowing a user to specify the
domain in which they wish to log on to just like the current DOS LAN
Requester does.

      By modifying the log-on panel which is displayed when a user
logs on to an OS/2* network using DOS LAN Requester Windows to accept
a domain field, the user is able to log on and access network
resources on a specific domain.  The domain which the user enters on
log-on panel is then used when the call is made to log the user on
the network.  This "log-on domain" is then used throughout the user's
Windows session when executing other functions using DOS LAN
Requester Windows.

      An example of how this log-on domain is used is when a user
browses network resources.  When a user browses network resources
they are only shown the resources which reside in their log-on
domain.  They are not shown any resources which reside on servers
which are not a part of their log-on domain.
*  Trademark of IBM Corp.