Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Increasing Graphics Printer Throughput and for Extending Ribbon Yield

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107888D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hays, DE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a program that pre-processes the data stream being sent to a printer capable of graphics output. The program enables a user to maximize both ribbon yield and printer throughput by converting escape sequences being sent to the printer to alternate ones that greatly affect speed and ribbon usage.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 78% of the total text.

Method for Increasing Graphics Printer Throughput and for Extending Ribbon Yield

      Disclosed is a program that pre-processes the data stream being
sent to a printer capable of graphics output.  The program enables a
user to maximize both ribbon yield and printer throughput by
converting escape sequences being sent to the printer to alternate
ones that greatly affect speed and ribbon usage.

      The user invokes the program from the command line with the
following syntax: fastprt [-w units]. Units is the number of
consecutive whitespace units that will cause the filter to optimize
the print datastream.  If the "w" option is not specified, the
program assumes 100 units.  After inserting itself into the operating
system's print control mechanism, the program returns control to the
user to allow the running of any application.  The filter constantly
parses the command escape sequences that are normally sent to the
printer by the user's applications.  Normally, the data stream is
passed on to the printer's microcode in unaltered form for execution.
However, when a graphics command is recognized, the filter buffers
the command until the protocol is completed.  When whitespace is
encountered that exceeds the user's specified units, the command is
split.  The binary stream ending with the 1 bit prefixing the
whitespace gap is sent as a separate graphics command followed by a
carrier return.  The buffered command is then zeroed out through the
current whitespac...