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A Strategy for Handling Recoverable Errors using Event Logs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107904D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baldiga, FP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for managing non-critical errors and informational events in a software subsystem is disclosed. This method reduces performance overhead by managing the information locally rather than sending it all to a central system console.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

A Strategy for Handling Recoverable Errors using Event Logs

      A method for managing non-critical errors and informational
events in a software subsystem is disclosed.  This method reduces
performance overhead by managing the information locally rather than
sending it all to a central system console.

      A means for local management of events in a software subsystem
is provided.  In this context, an event is the occurrence of a
recoverable error or some other behavior that is worthy of note at a
point in time.  For example, it may indicate a soft error, a warning
condition, a threshold exceeded or an expired timer.  An event does
not require immediate analysis or service action.

      Events are stored in a local buffer called an event log.  The
event log is sent to the console only by request. In contrast,
notification of non-recoverable conditions are sent immediately to
the system console.  The contents of the event log can be viewed by
developers, service personnel or even end-users to understand what is
happening in the subsystem and recognize potential problems.

      Events and errors are categorized into classes based on the
severity of the problem.  A class 1 error is an event and is the
least severe.  Errors of class 3 or greater are more severe and
always reported to the system console.  A class 2 error is unique in
that it is an event but it is also reported to the system console.
This type of condition would typically be for err...