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Wet Nitrogen Blanketing of Wet Processing Solutions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107922D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaplan, LH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device for stabilization of wet processing baths which are sensitive to air components, thus minimizing the cost of chemicals and their disposal. The process tank is provided with a means of continuously covering the liquid surface with a blanket of gas inert to the process solution. The gas is first passed through a saturator containing the volatile components of the process solution so that evaporation of these will be discouraged.

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Wet Nitrogen Blanketing of Wet Processing Solutions

      Disclosed is a device for stabilization of wet processing baths
which are sensitive to air components, thus minimizing the cost of
chemicals and their disposal.  The process tank is provided with a
means of continuously covering the liquid surface with a blanket of
gas inert to the process solution. The gas is first passed through a
saturator containing the volatile components of the process solution
so that evaporation of these will be discouraged.

      In manufacturing operation, a wet process is generally carried
out in a large tank, complete with circulation, filtration and
temperature control.  For access, the tank opening must be large,
allowing substantial interfacing with ambient air, even when covered.

      Process solutions, such as strongly alkaline materials, may
react with air components, such as carbon dioxide.  To prevent this,
a blanket of inert gas, such as nitrogen, may be established over the
liquid surface.  This may be done simply by placing a pipe around the
periphery of the upper tank wall, said pipe being perforated to
direct streams of gas parallel to the surface.

      To prevent evaporation of volatile components, especially for
high processing temperatures, the gas should first be directed
through a "bubbler", where it is saturated with the volatile
component.  For example, if an aqueous solution is being used, the
gas would be saturated with water before being di...