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Phosphor Mask for Laser Ablation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000107923D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaplan, LH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a mask for creating a pattern of high fluence laser radiation for the purpose of ablating patterned areas of a target substrate. The masking function is provided by a single layer of deposited, patterned phosphor. This layer blocks the laser radiation and re-emits the energy at a lower frequency which is not absorbed by the target material.

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Phosphor Mask for Laser Ablation

      Disclosed is a mask for creating a pattern of high fluence
laser radiation for the purpose of ablating patterned areas of a
target substrate.  The masking function is provided by a single layer
of deposited, patterned phosphor.  This layer blocks the laser
radiation and re-emits the energy at a lower frequency which is not
absorbed by the target material.

      Present laser ablation masks involve the use of dielectric
stacks, manufactured by a meticulous process involving successive
depositions of many layers of dielectrics whose thicknesses and
refractive indices are specifically engineered to reflect the
particular laser wavelength being used.  Fabrication of such masks is
both costly and inefficient.

      Fabrication of a phosphor mask, on the other hand, is
relatively simple.  The phosphor layer is deposited on a quartz
substrate by any desired means, including physical vapor deposition
(evaporation, sputtering, etc.) and chemical vapor deposition
(low-pressure, high-pressure, etc.)  The nature of the phosphor
material is dictated by three consideration: first is the ability to
form a mechanically and thermally stable film on quartz.  Second is
the excitation band of the phosphor, which must include the chosen
laser's emission.  Third is the emission band of the phosphor, which
must be limited to a wavelength range poorly absorbed by the target
material.

      Disclosed anonymously.