Browse Prior Art Database

Tactile Display of Output from Automatic Speech Recognizer to the Hearing Impaired

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108048D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gopalakrishnan, PS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There are several basic ways to convey information to the hearing impaired which they cannot receive via hearing. These include: (1) hearing and tactile aids, (2) cohlear implants, and (3) an automatic speech recognizer (ASR).

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Tactile Display of Output from Automatic Speech Recognizer to the Hearing Impaired

       There are several  basic ways to convey information to
the hearing impaired which they cannot receive via hearing. These
include: (1) hearing and tactile aids, (2) cohlear implants, and (3)
an automatic speech recognizer (ASR).

      Standard hearing and tactile aids, and also cohlear implants,
provide their users with natural and coded information.  But, for
now, if the user has significant loss in hearing, these methods do
not provide adequate aids.

      The reason for this is due to the fact that, on the one hand,
the hearing sensors are too weak to satisfactorily convey natural
codes (as amplified sounds).  And, on the other hand, users cannot
learn all coding information that they receive via tactile aids or
cohlear implants.  This happens because the current means that
transform natural speech sounds into coding patterns provide users
with complex and confusable information that exceed their ability to
learn.

      Only ASR provides users with information that is represented in
easily understandable clues  -  strings of letters that represent
words (*).  Nevertheless, this approach still has the following
deficiency - it requires a user to look at a terminal all the time
during a conversation.

      This makes it difficult for the hearing impaired user to  use
additional sources of information as lipreading that may be needed if
ASR has low decoding accuracy.  Also it makes it difficult to use ASR
like hearing devices that are almost invisible to other people.  It
is well known that this esthetic factor plays a significant role for
the hearing-impaired users.  Known solutions to this problem, e.g.,
to display an ASR output on spectacles, only partly solve this
problem since it still requires the...