Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Multimedia Non-repudiation in Computer Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108068D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Inniss, HA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Authentication of messages transmitted across an electronic network is currently performed by attaching an authentication token to the messages. Yet even with these asymmetric token generation algorithms, the sender of a message can deny that they originated the message, because the receiver could have forged an apparently valid conventional token. This invention supplements the use of a conventional authentication token to provide strong evidence of the origin of a message.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Multimedia Non-repudiation in Computer Networks

       Authentication of messages transmitted across an
electronic network is currently performed by attaching an
authentication token to the messages.  Yet even with these asymmetric
token generation algorithms, the sender of a message can deny that
they originated the message, because the receiver could have forged
an apparently valid conventional token.  This invention supplements
the use of a conventional authentication token to provide strong
evidence of the origin of a message.

      A new type of authentication token, known as Media Intensified
Non-repudiation Token (MINT), can be attached to each distribution
sent within a data network.  The MINT cryptographically contains
information that supports the authentication that the user performed
the specified operation.  Through the use of multimedia devices, a
media portrayal of the operation can be recorded during the specified
act.  This portrayal can then be cryptographically and digitally
incorporated into the MINT.  Upon a recipient wishing to verify the
authentication of an operation by an originator, the recipient could
decipher the MINT, using typical cryptographical means.  The
recipient could then view/hear the originator performing the actual
act in question.  The presence of video and audio information of the
originator substantially enhances the credibility that the originator
did perform the operation under dispute.  The MINT can be
incorporated with date/time stamps, message identi...