Browse Prior Art Database

Behavioral Camera Framing Cone

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108110D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 4 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Comerford, LD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that, when affixed to the front of a video or still camera, enables the person at whom the camera is pointing to align himself or herself (or align the camera) so that he or she is framed correctly (i.e., centered in the viewfinder).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Behavioral Camera Framing Cone

       Disclosed is a device that, when affixed to the front of
a video or still camera, enables the person at whom the camera is
pointing to align himself or herself (or align the camera) so that he
or she is framed correctly (i.e., centered in the viewfinder).

      Users of public kiosks are of different heights.  If the kiosk
has a video camera above the display to take a video snapshot of a
user, there is no convenient way to make sure a person's face is
centered in the shot.  By using the Behavioral Camera Framing Cone,
system designers can induce the user to get framed correctly in the
shot.

      The scenario for this invention is a multi-media computer
workstation or kiosk having a camera pointing toward the user.  At
certain times, users may wish to frame a nice picture of themselves
to be captured by the system. There are two reasons why it may be
difficult for the users to position themselves or, conversely, to
position the camera, so that they are framed correctly:
1.   The system, for reasons of economy or incompatibility, may not
have a live video display that the user can check to see that they
are standing in the correct spot.
2.   Even with a live video display, one must, perforce, look away
from the camera lens to check their framing (unless cumbersome
solutions using split mirrors are invoked).

      The Behavioral Camera Framing Cone solves the framing problem
in a much more elegant fashion.  The user looks into the lens opening
and moves him or herself or tilts the camera, if it is mounted on a
pivot (like the displays on some ATMs) until he or she can fully see
the colored ring. At that point the picture is framed correctly.

      Fig. 1 shows the preferred implementation.  The cone comprises
two conic sections, an interior one and an exterior one.  There is a
colored ring (perhaps green) at the base of the cone, possibly with
words printed on it which the user will only be able to see
completely when he or she is positioned at the correct distance and
angle. Having words printed on the colored ring (...