Browse Prior Art Database

Resort of Color Blocks for Tetris Composite Calendar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108115D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baber, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It is possible to graph calendar events by representing each event as a series of graphic rectangles of the same color, each rectangle corresponding to a constant time increment, typically fifteen minutes. Then the rectangles are displayed on a time line. If two events occur at the same time, they are stacked, creating a column. There are no blank spaces in any column that has a rectangle. This type of graph shows at a glance what times during a day are most busy.

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Resort of Color Blocks for Tetris Composite Calendar

       It is possible to graph calendar events by representing
each event as a series of graphic rectangles of the same color, each
rectangle corresponding to a constant time increment, typically
fifteen minutes.  Then the rectangles are displayed on a time line.
If two events occur at the same time, they are stacked, creating a
column.  There are no blank spaces in any column that has a
rectangle.  This type of graph shows at a glance what times during a
day are most busy.

      One aspect of this graph is that there is no guarantee that a
color block corresponding to an individual will always be at the same
place in each stack of blocks.  For example, if Joe has a meeting
from ten to twelve, his color block may appear at the bottom of the
stack at ten o'clock, but in the middle of the stack or higher at
eleven o'clock. This makes it difficult to determine just how busy
Joe is. It would be nice to have all the blocks belonging to Joe in
one horizontal plane so that you could see that he is busy
continuously from ten until twelve.  That is impossible to to do for
every person given the rules of the Tetris graph.

      The solution is to resort the blocks of the graph, putting
Joe's color at the bottom of every stack in which it appears.  The
right mouse button executes this sort when it is clicked on any one
of Joe's blocks.  Similarly, any person may be resorted to appear at
the bottom.  If all of...