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Process for Depositing Polymer Coatings of Micron Level Uniformity from Powdered Polymer Precursors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108139D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Diaz, A: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A solvent-free process for depositing highly uniform polymer coatings for polymer dielectric and other applications is described. In this process particles of resin blends are prepared by first melt-mixing or solvent blending, then milling and size classification. The particles have an average diameter between 6 and 14 mm, and a size distribution with most of the particles between 4 and 20 mm. The powder is then sprayed onto the desired surface using an air gun to produce a near monolayer coverage. The resulting powder film is subsequently heated to melt the particles into a planarizing film with a thickness of ca. 5 mm. The monolayer coverage is controlled by spraying the charged particles in an electric field between the spray nozzle and the surface of interest, or a ground plane behind the surface.

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Process for Depositing Polymer Coatings of Micron Level Uniformity from Powdered Polymer Precursors

      A solvent-free process for depositing highly uniform polymer
coatings for polymer dielectric and other applications is described.
In this process particles of  resin blends are prepared by first
melt-mixing or solvent blending, then milling and size
classification.  The particles have an average diameter between 6 and
14 mm, and a size distribution with most of the particles between 4
and 20 mm. The powder is then sprayed onto the desired surface using
an air gun to produce a near monolayer coverage.  The resulting
powder film is subsequently heated to melt the particles into a
planarizing film with a thickness of ca. 5 mm.  The monolayer
coverage is controlled by spraying the charged particles in an
electric field between the spray nozzle and the surface of interest,
or a ground plane behind the surface.  Alternatively, an insulating
surface can be charged with a dc corona to create the electric field.

      Thermosetting systems based on epoxy, cyanto, norborene,
malemide and other crosslinking chemistry may be viable candidates
for powder coatings provided the correct modulus/rheology is
achieved.  Generally, it is desirable to have a low molecular weight
material with a melting or softening point above room temperature, to
allow shelf-life, which melts to a nonviscous melt to produce a
planarizing coating and with thermosetting chemistry at a
substant...