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Reduced Particulate Plasma Chamber

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108187D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Logan, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of reducing particle formation from chamber wall deposits, by choice of chamber materials. The method involves the use of an unusual choice of materials for a plasma process chamber where process products are accumulated as a film of increasing thickness during processing, and which can become a source of particles by adhesion/cohesion failure due to stress within the film. The particular materials which have been found to be advantageous are titanium and certain alloys of titanium, such as Ti-Al-V. These materials have been found to be able to retain chamber deposits much thicker than other more commonly used materials, such as aluminum alloys, anodized aluminum alloys, or stainless steels.

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Reduced Particulate Plasma Chamber

      Disclosed is a method of reducing particle formation from
chamber wall deposits, by choice of chamber materials.  The method
involves the use of an unusual choice of materials for a plasma
process chamber where process products are accumulated as a film of
increasing thickness during processing, and which can become a source
of particles by adhesion/cohesion failure due to stress within the
film. The particular materials which have been found to be
advantageous are titanium and certain alloys of titanium, such as
Ti-Al-V.  These materials have been found to be able to retain
chamber deposits much thicker than other more commonly used
materials, such as aluminum alloys, anodized aluminum alloys, or
stainless steels.  The improvement has been measured using particle
counters installed in the vacuum chamber, to measure particle
emissions from these materials immediately after processing, over
many process cycles.

      It is believed that the improvement comes primarily from the
basic material properties, such as low thermal expansion coefficient,
combined with a very high adhesion to the film material.  To get
maximum benefit from the material, it is also disclosed that the
chamber material should be controlled at constant temperature,
wherever this is practical.

      Disclosed anonymously.