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Method for Word Decomposition of Conjunctions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108201D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Previous word processing applications have provided some method of spell checking. While this is usually accomplished by comparing the unknown word to a predefined list (the dictionary of the word processor), limitations exist with this technique. No allowance is offered for when words are correctly spelled, but word spaces are inadvertently left out or deleted during the editing process.

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Method for Word Decomposition of Conjunctions

       Previous word processing applications have provided some
method of spell checking. While this is usually accomplished by
comparing the unknown word to a predefined list (the dictionary of
the word processor), limitations exist with this technique. No
allowance is offered for when words are correctly spelled, but word
spaces are inadvertently left out or deleted during the editing
process.

      This article describes a technique for an additional compare of
the words being spell checked. If the potentially misspelled word is
not recognized after a compare process with the dictionary or has
little similarity with the words presented in the list of potential
corrected words, a word processing service would display a list of
possible words derived from inserting spaces within the word to
formulate multiple correctly spelled words.

      For example, consider the word 'aloft'. Is the user intending
to speak of things in the sky or is he speaking of a barn attic?
Spelling errors could also be present as the user have meant to say
'a lift'.  Without presenting the user with an incorrectly spaced
word, the word processor's spell check function will continue on as
if 'aloft' is correct. But by providing a word spacing function, the
word processor would stop and list as a possible correction to
'aloft' either 'a loft' or 'a lift'. The user would be free to select
either choice or ignore and continue, just as with any...