Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Window Definition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108217D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 5 page(s) / 848K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Redpath, SD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Currently, windows are defined with a background, or workarea, and a titlebar, and a 3-6 pel border around the whole rectangle. The border has two functions: to define the window from the desktop, and to show the user where to go to re-size the window (see Fig. 1).

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Visual Window Definition

       Currently, windows are defined with a background, or
workarea, and a titlebar, and a 3-6 pel border around the whole
rectangle.  The border has two functions:  to define the window from
the desktop, and to show the user where to go to re-size the window
(see Fig. 1).

      The window border is unnecessary clutter and an inefficient use
of space.  In the real world a person does not need a heavy black
line around a piece of paper on his office desk to see where it is.
He uses color definition to determine the edges.  The extra pels used
for window border definition is overkill.

      When windows overlap, a one-pel border around the current
window is visible (see Fig. 3).  This one-pel line is the same color
as the desktop (see Fig. 2), so it disappears when the window is on
the desktop.  The window backgrounds are of similar hue, unlike the
desktop color, so we retain the one-pel border because a slightly
stronger visual separation is needed when windows overlap.

      For determining the re-size area, the user needs only to move
to the edge of the window.  Within a certain cursor-sensitive area
the cursor will change to one of a family of re-size arrows.  When
the cursor changes, the user will know he or she is within the range
where he can click and re-size the window (see Figs. 4 and 5).