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Viewing Data within a Three Dimensional Space by Two Dimensional Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108235D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bird, CL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Multi-dimensional data volumes, particularly three-dimensional (3D) volumes, are commonly visualized using one or more of the techniques currently available. When the data needs to be examined or modified, as an adjunct to visualization, the problem of navigating throughout the volume arises. It is essential to be able to see a particular region of the data in the context of the surrounding data. Orthogonal cut planes have been used extensively for this purpose, reducing the dimensionality from 3D to 2D, and presenting 2 or 3 of the mutually orthogonal planes through a chosen point.

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Viewing Data within a Three Dimensional Space by Two Dimensional Devices

       Multi-dimensional data volumes, particularly
three-dimensional (3D) volumes, are commonly visualized using one or
more of the techniques currently available. When the data needs to be
examined or modified, as an adjunct to visualization, the problem of
navigating throughout the volume arises.  It is essential to be able
to see a particular region of the data in the context of the
surrounding data.  Orthogonal cut planes have been used extensively
for this purpose, reducing the dimensionality from 3D to 2D, and
presenting 2 or 3 of the mutually orthogonal planes through a chosen
point.

      Disclosed is a method that also involves cutting planes, but
permits an expanded view of a region of the data by showing images of
the data on selected walls of a cube (Fig. 1) described as a chair
because of its appearance when the cuboid is centrally placed in the
data-set. The front and top of the chair may lie within the data
volume and do not necessarily coincide with the corresponding
surfaces of the data volume.  The notion of a chair is not in itself
original, but the method of displaying the chair, and interacting
with the display is novel.  The basic method of display is to form an
opened-out development of four faces of the chair (Fig. 2).

      Such data is readily available from the 3D volume and can be
very rapidly presented.  The option can then be given to the viewer
to vie...