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Method to Consolidate Patches Deposited by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108258D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Caulfield, T: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The topology of Laser Chemical Vapor Deposited (LCVD) connections created are a function of both the laser writing conditions and the localized environment in the area of the connection. Even under the best controlled laser conditions, topology variations can result, which can impact the reliability of the joint, make it difficult to overcoat with new thin film layers, or create risk sites for the joining of low clearance components.

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Method to Consolidate Patches Deposited by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

       The topology of Laser Chemical Vapor Deposited (LCVD)
connections created are a function of both the laser writing
conditions and the localized environment in the area of the
connection.  Even under the best controlled laser conditions,
topology variations can result, which can impact the reliability of
the joint, make it difficult to overcoat with new thin film layers,
or create risk sites for the joining of low clearance components.

      The electrical and mechanical properties of laser deposited
films are not those of bulk films.  The deposited film resistivity is
typically 2-4 times that of bulk materials, and the junction between
newly deposited films and existing structures typically show little
metallurgical interaction.  These characteristics are not due to
incomplete pyrolysis of the organometallic; in fact, the films have
high chemical purity.  Instead, they are a result of the
microstructure, which has a high degree of porosity. The lack of
deposit densification or metallurgical interaction are a direct
result of the high deposition rates and the low deposition
temperatures inherent in the LCVD process.

      Described here is a mechanical method that is capable of
controlling the topology of the repair as well as improving the
mechanical and electrical integrity of the connection.  It uses
mechanical and/or thermomechanical energy to deform and densify the
lase...