Browse Prior Art Database

Leakage Controlled Switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108274D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aitken, JM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The Leakage-Controlled Switch (LCS) is shown in generic form in the figure. It comprises two 2-terminal devices in series, their common terminal being connected to the control terminal of a 3-terminal device. Prior to stress, devices 1 and 2 are both non-conducting. Device 1 can be made leaky by applying a stress voltage across terminals A and B. Device 2 can be made leaky by applying a stress voltage across terminals A and C. In a typical application, terminal A is allowed to float, its voltage being determined by the states (non-conducting or leaky) of devices 1 and 2, and by the voltage assignments of terminals B and C. For example, if C is grounded and B is tied to the supply, A tends toward ground if device 2 has been stressed; toward the supply if device 1 has been stressed.

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Leakage Controlled Switch

       The Leakage-Controlled Switch (LCS) is shown in generic
form in the figure.  It comprises two 2-terminal devices in series,
their common terminal being connected to the control terminal of a
3-terminal device.  Prior to stress, devices 1 and 2 are both
non-conducting.  Device 1 can be made leaky by applying a stress
voltage across terminals A and B. Device 2 can be made leaky by
applying a stress voltage across terminals A and C.  In a typical
application, terminal A is allowed to float, its voltage being
determined by the states (non-conducting or leaky) of devices 1 and
2, and by the voltage assignments of terminals B and C.  For example,
if C is grounded and B is tied to the supply, A tends toward ground
if device 2 has been stressed; toward the supply if device 1 has been
stressed.  The voltage at A is applied to the high impedance control
terminal of device 3 and determines whether device 3 is in the
conducting or non-conducting state.  Thus, by selectively stressing
either device 1 or device 2, we can program device 3 ("the fuse") to
be either conducting ("closed") or non-conducting ("open").  Though
the LCS is described above in terms of devices 1 and 2 which start
out as non-conducting and then are leaky after stress, devices with
the opposite behavior can also serve; the programming procedure being
reversed.

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      The LCS could be used to replac...