Browse Prior Art Database

Virtual Mouse

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108294D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mitchell, KP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a methodology for improving the overall efficiency and usability of dealing with applications requiring the use of a pointing device such as a Mouse. PC users often find it difficult to use a "mouse" or pointing device to manipulate the elements of a graphical user interface (GUI) on the computer screen. The mouse tends to be located away from (off to the side) of the keyboard and screen. Where as the mouse is moved around in a horizontal plane, it controls a cursor on a vertical plane (the screen). If the user is sitting at an angle to the screen, relating the movement of the mouse to the cursor becomes even more difficult. In addition, the absolute location of the mouse is usually unrelated to the location of the cursor.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Virtual Mouse

       This article describes a methodology for improving the
overall efficiency and usability of dealing with applications
requiring the use of a pointing device such as a Mouse.  PC users
often find it difficult to use a "mouse" or pointing device to
manipulate the elements of a graphical user interface (GUI) on the
computer screen.  The mouse tends to be located away from (off to the
side) of the keyboard and screen.  Where as the mouse is moved around
in a horizontal plane, it controls a cursor on a vertical plane (the
screen).  If the user is sitting at an angle to the screen, relating
the movement of the mouse to the cursor becomes even more difficult.
In addition, the absolute location of the mouse is usually unrelated
to the location of the cursor.  This requires the user to frequently
"pick up" the mouse to allow for further relative movements.

      Touch screens have been developed to help address this problem.
The problem with touch screens is that usually only limited function
is available.  Since you only have one finger (as opposed to 2 or 3
buttons on a mouse), it is difficult to implement equivalent
function.  In addition, because the typical finger is too large to
work with the small icons and functions required for most GUIs, a
'pen' is often used to perform the touch functions.  So once again,
users are forced to use an awkward, unnatural device to manipulate
the user interface.  So the question becomes one of how can we
perform the functions provided by a pointing device in a more natural
and user friendly manner.

      The concepts employed in 'Virtual Reality' allow for the
detection and in...