Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard String Record/ Playback Naming for Dependent Workstations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108309D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 5 page(s) / 275K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aaker, KD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A means by which keystroke strings can be recorded on a workstation controller on behalf of attached dependent workstations is disclosed. Furthermore, a mouse-driven, natural language interface for the access of these stored strings is detailed. The preferred embodiment is described for a class of dependent workstations known as X servers.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 24% of the total text.

Keyboard String Record/ Playback Naming for Dependent Workstations

       A means by which keystroke strings can be recorded on a
workstation controller on behalf of attached dependent workstations
is disclosed.  Furthermore, a mouse-driven, natural language
interface for the access of these stored strings is detailed.  The
preferred embodiment is described for a class of dependent
workstations known as X servers.

      The install base of several different types of dependent
terminals is very high (and the application base to go with them).
For example, ASCII terminals, IBM 3270 terminals, and IBM 5250
terminals.  Most current models of these displays have the capability
to record arbitrary sequences of keys and associate a much shorter
key string (for example, the Alt & P keys held down together) to be
used to send the previously recorded keys to the attached host.  This
function is used typically where complex sequences, or often used
sequences, have to be keyed in often.  This improves productivity by
sending keys to the system faster than an average typist, avoids
mistakes, and serves to "remember" infrequently used long keying
sequences that would normally be error prone.  Typically, the user
must request that a new keystroke sequence is to be recorded by
pressing a dedicated "start recording" key, or key combination,
followed by the keystroke sequence used to trigger the playback
sequence later.  Next, the actual keystroke sequence that is to be
recalled later is entered with the keys optionally being sent to the
attached host or local application as they are recorded.  Finally, an
"end recording" key or sequence is pressed.

      On programmable workstations, local direct access storage
device (DASD) files provide non-volatile storage to save recorded
keystrokes between power on/off cycles. Either keystroke strings are
recorded in the same manner as NPT workstations, or a text editor is
used to enter revisable form text tokens representing keystroke names
for later interpretation as they are played.  In some cases, entry of
keystroke sequences for later playback must be done mnemonically or,
in the worst case, as hexadecimal key scan codes.  It should be
apparent that recording keystrokes as they occur is much easier than
having to do the "programming" of generating artificial sequences.

      There is a different distribution of function in workstation
terminal emulators and X server controllers. Both enable a graphical
user interface (GUI) capable device to run host-based textual
applications designed for a specific type of dependent terminal.  A
workstation terminal emulator runs on the work station itself and
allows the workstation user to access a type of dependent terminal
applications; two computer systems are involved: the host system and
the workstation. For an X server controller, three computer systems
are involved:  the host system is the same as above, an X server
controller (possibly capa...