Browse Prior Art Database

Adherent Metal Pattern Coatings on Teflon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108324D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Elsner, G: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a laser-enhanced metal deposition technique which allows coating TEFLON* with metal films of good adhesion.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Adherent Metal Pattern Coatings on Teflon

       This article describes a laser-enhanced metal deposition
technique which allows coating TEFLON* with metal films of good
adhesion.

      TEFLON is an important technological material wherever a low
dielectric constant, good electrical insulation, and inertness to a
wide range of chemical corrosion are required.  However, because of
its inertness, TEFLON metallization is extremely difficult to handle
by conventional techniques.

      The recently introduced ion beam enhanced deposition (IBED)
involves electron beam-induced metal deposition of, say, a TEFLON
surface which is simultaneously irradiated with low-energy,
high-current ion beams.  The ion beams lead to microroughening and
the creation of nucleation and bonding sites on the TEFLON surface,
which allows the metal and the TEFLON material to interdiffuse at the
metal/TEFLON interface and a strong adhesion of the deposited metal
film.

      Laser-enhanced metal deposition, to which this article relates,
offers several advantages over IBED.  In contrast to IBED,
laser-enhanced desposition does not require a high vacuum.  It uses
only one laser and allows a patterned metallization of TEFLON
surfaces, as will be described below.

      The laser-enhanced metal deposition technique uses standard
XeCl excimer laser radiation of 10 to 20 nsec. pulse length.  The
laser beam serves to irradiate the TEFLON surface and a metal target
for standard CVD (chemical vapor deposition).  A beam splitter
divides the laser beam appropriately.

      XeCl excimer laser radiation of 10 to 20 nsec. pulse length
does not ablate TEFLON but onl...