Browse Prior Art Database

Etch Process for Thin Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108343D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hetherington, RJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for defining thin film patterns, by etching, on multi-layer, metallized ceramic or glass/ceramic substrates. The process does not affect the substrate metallurgy, allows conventional photoresist removal techniques to be used, and provides top chrome coverage for the thin film features. The invention utilizes conventional techniques in a non-conventional manner.

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Etch Process for Thin Films

       Disclosed is a process for defining thin film patterns,
by etching, on multi-layer, metallized ceramic or glass/ceramic
substrates.  The process does not affect the substrate metallurgy,
allows conventional photoresist removal techniques to be used, and
provides top chrome coverage for the thin film features.  The
invention utilizes conventional techniques in a non-conventional
manner.

      The process begins by depositing a blanket metal film of
chrome/ copper/chrome (Cr1/Cu/Cr2) directly on the substrate surface
(Fig. 1) Cr2 is deliberately made thicker than Cr1 by an amount of 3
to 4 times.  The metal blanket is then coated with photoresist and
the desired thin film pattern photo developed (Fig. 2).  The top
chrome (Cr2) and copper is then etched away, using conventional wet
etching means, leaving a partially defined pattern consisting of
photoresist on top of the areas where thin film features are to be
defined and a continuous layer of chrome (Cr1) on the substrate
surface (Fig. 3).

      At this point photoresist is removed before the thin film
pattern is fully defined (there is a continuous film of chrome (Cr1)
still interconnecting all of the thin film features).  See Fig. 4.
To complete the thin film pattern definition this remaining chrome
film (Cr1), which is on the substrate surface, is removed by dry
etching (e.g., ion beam) which does not attack the substrate
metallurgy and is designed to leave a film of...