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Remote Binding for DOS and Windows Database Clients

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108369D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Amundsen, LC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The current implementation of the Database Manager DOS and Windows database clients does not support remote binding. Application binding can only be achieved by copying application bind files to the database server and manually invoking the SQLBIND command. DOS and Windows client applications cannot be bound remotely, nor can they bind themselves at run time, like OS/2* client applications can.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Remote Binding for DOS and Windows Database Clients

       The current implementation of the Database Manager DOS
and Windows database clients does not support remote binding.
Application binding can only be achieved by copying application bind
files to the database server and manually invoking the SQLBIND
command.  DOS and Windows client applications cannot be bound
remotely, nor can they bind themselves at run time, like OS/2* client
applications can.

      This article describes an algorithm for using the Database
Application Remote Interface (ARI) feature of Database Manager to
allow remote binding of DOS and Windows Database Client applications.
The technique described involves passing a bind (.BND) file across
the network and executing the BIND utility at the database server.
Error information is then passed back to the client application for
display to the user.

      An algorithm is described for implementing remote binding for
the DOS and Windows Database Client features of Database Manager.
BINDING OVERVIEW

      The binding operation accepts a bind (.BND) file as input and
is executed against an existing database.  Options pertaining to
binding operation can also be supplied. The result of the bind
operation is an access plan stored in the database.

      The operation currently can only be performed on a OS/2
database server or a OS/2 database client.  This causes inconvenience
for administrators of DOS and Windows Database Clients because they
must copy an application's bind files to another workstation and
manua...