Browse Prior Art Database

Process for the Deposition of Chromium

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108404D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Skidmore, DG: AUTHOR

Abstract

A low-energy method is described for the deposition of chromium that eliminates the usual substrate heating and precleaning required by thermal evaporation processes. The proposed technique employs a unique combination of parameters in a partially ionized deposition (PID) process. The parameters that differ from those previously employed include lower acceleration voltage, lower wafer temperature and smaller size chromium source.

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Process for the Deposition of Chromium

      A low-energy method is described for the deposition of chromium
that eliminates the usual substrate heating and precleaning required
by thermal evaporation processes.  The proposed technique employs a
unique combination of parameters in a partially ionized deposition
(PID) process. The parameters that differ from those previously
employed include lower acceleration voltage, lower wafer temperature
and smaller size chromium source.

      The deposition of chromium by means of PID is proposed as an
alternative to the deposition of metal alloys on semiconductor
wafers.  PID offers improved adhesion and reduced heat-induced film
stress.  Previously reported PID techniques are suited to some
ion-plated products, but are not suited to semiconductor processing
because they require voltages that are too high (several thousand
electron volts), currents that are too low and temperatures that are
too high.  In the proposed low-energy process, those parameters that
could be damaging to semiconductors are controlled and used to
advantage.

      It is proposed that the tool to be used for the PID process be
an induction heated chromium evaporator source fitted with an
ionizer.  The chromium source used for PID would need to be
approximately 25% of the size commonly used for aluminum and copper
sources if the chromium source is to yield high ionization at low
evaporation rates.  The proposed low-energy PID process makes use...