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Browse Prior Art Database

Audio Notification of Inconsequential Distributions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108460D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 97K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

With the advent of the electronic office, there has been a prevalent explosion of messages, notes, and other distributions which are not of a significant matter being distributed throughout a network. This article describes a method for notification of inconsequential distributions, i.e., junk mail.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Audio Notification of Inconsequential Distributions

       With the advent of the electronic office, there has been
a prevalent explosion of messages, notes, and other distributions
which are not of a significant matter being distributed throughout a
network.  This article describes a method for notification of
inconsequential distributions, i.e., junk mail.

      One property for determining inconsequential distributions is
that the distribution is sent to a multitude of individuals.  The
distribution is not directed to a single individual, but to multiple
users.  This property can be used to determine the significance of
the distributions.

      This article encompasses a method whereby a distinguishable
tone or sequence of tones can be associated for each distribution.
This method differs from prior methods which simply produces an audio
tone upon reception of new mail.  The terms tone and sound can be
used interchangeably with reference to this article.

      Given that within a typical office environment, personal
workstations are often within audio range of each other, a unique
tone for a particular message can be generated, thus allowing other
users to hear the same identical tone or sequence of tones on other
machines.  This sound would signify that the distribution may be of
an inconsequential nature.

      Given that a multitude of distributions may be constantly
arriving at a plurality of workstations, a method is needed to
differentiate the audio tones for each distribution.  Currently, most
mail systems, have an Identifier which uniquely identifies the
message within the network, sometimes referred to as Unique
Distribution Identifier, or UDI.

      This UDI can be used as key for a function to generate a
number, which can be used as an index into an array which contains
reference to the tone(s) which should be generated. This array would
contain differing tone(s) for each entry in the array.  The function
which is performed on the UDI should be of a nature such that a well
distributed sequence of numbers are generated so as the function does
not produce identical numbers on differing UDIs.  It should be noted
that the larger the array, the larger the range of numbers that can
be produced without collision of entries within the array.  The
following is an implementation example of a function which can be
us...