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Browse Prior Art Database

Multiple Equivalent Icons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108489D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 211K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, D: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A method for providing multiple icon representations of the same underlying object, and a method for managing a user's interactions with those multiple appearances are disclosed. A user can get more than one icon for any object in a graphical windowing environment and get more than one appearance of any piece of data, such as a chart, in more than one location at a time. Each of the appearances refers back to the same object, so a user does not have to sacrifice disk space for multiple copies of the same object. Also, any change that affects the object is reflected in each appearance of that object in the interface. In this way, a user can treat each appearance as a distinct object without worry about updating multiple appearances of an object if its data changes.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Multiple Equivalent Icons

       A method for providing multiple icon representations of
the same underlying object, and a method for managing a user's
interactions with those multiple appearances are disclosed.  A user
can get more than one icon for any object in a graphical windowing
environment and get more than one appearance of any piece of data,
such as a chart, in more than one location at a time.  Each of the
appearances refers back to the same object, so a user does not have
to sacrifice disk space for multiple copies of the same object. Also,
any change that affects the object is reflected in each appearance of
that object in the interface.  In this way, a user can treat each
appearance as a distinct object without worry about updating multiple
appearances of an object if its data changes.

      In a graphical user interface, icons represent the data,
device, and container objects in a user's environment. A user can
place this icon anywhere in the environment, or can open this icon
and see the contents or settings of the underlying object.  Any
change a user makes in the window is either immediately or later
changed in the underlying object.  In this manner, a user will treat
the icon and the object as one and the same.

      In some cases, however, a user may wish to have more than one
icon for the same object and still be able to place each icon
wherever desired, independently of others, as if each were the only
icon representing the object (...