Browse Prior Art Database

Context-Identified Values and Corresponding Format

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108495D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 167K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzgerald, AK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The design and architecture described in this article provides for an architectural enrichment of SNA by which sets of data can be exchanged between partners with assurance that the sender and receiver use the same rules of interpretation.

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Context-Identified Values and Corresponding Format

       The design and architecture described in this article
provides for an architectural enrichment of SNA by which sets of data
can be exchanged between partners with assurance that the sender and
receiver use the same rules of interpretation.

      The data structure description associated with this design and
architecture provides for a formal and complete definition of the
format of a data collection with its context identifier, but with a
partial definition of the semantics of the content of that
collection, thus allowing the communicating partners flexibility in
determining the data to be shared, while ensuring consistent
interpretation of those data.

      A need exists for an architected format for enveloping
architected or unarchitected data such that the contained data will
be predictably interpreted.  In particular, a formal set of vectors
with structured data is needed by automated network and system
manager and products with which it communicates, to ensure that those
data are properly interpreted.

      There exist broad requirements for Remote, Unattended, and
Automated Operation (RUAO) of interconnected computers. To effect
Automated remote operations, it is necessary for a program at one
computer to deliver commands or requests to some processing agent
(implemented in hardware or software) usually in another computer,
requesting it to perform specific actions.  The results of those
actions may be reported back to the requester, immediately or later,
depending on the request.

      There are numerous examples of the need to exchange commands
and responses between automata.  It is well known that commands and
responses require operands to fully specify the activity result.
Therefore, the commands and responses are not necessarily simple or
short.  Furthermore, the differences between a command and a
notification are often unimportant -- they both deliver information
to the other partner.  But the command thread among the information
described above is that the data represented in the command,
response, or notification must be understood by the communication
partners.

      This design and architecture enables the sending and receiving
partners to exchange reasonably complex data with assurance that the
data will be properly interpreted.

      The SNA architecture is well known and available, and is a
popular vehicle for exchanging data in a disciplined manner among
processing agents in a variety of computers. This data structure
description enriches that architecture so that applications using the
SNA architecture and the SNA/Management Services level can exchange
data in a defined format.  With this data structure description, a
new structure augments prior formats; that description requires the
transfer, between the partners, of a means of identifying the context
such that the remaining data in the structure has a basis for
interpre...