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Obtaining Metal Seeds from Harmless Solvents with a Metallorganic Suspension

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108516D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vigliotti, DR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Metal seeds are particularly important for circuit repair and for the design of circuits where localized or patterned metal is used to circuitize. Pd-acetate pyrolyzed with a laser to form a thin layer of Pd has been used extensively for this purpose. Generally, solutions of Pd-acetate are made with solvents, such as chloroform, a solvent in which the Pd-acetate readily dissolves. However, due to the toxicity of chloroform, as well as the toxicity of a number of other commonly used organic solvents, there exists a need for less harmful solvents. We have found that ethanol can be used to form a suspension of Pd- acetate which can be applied in droplet form or sprayed onto a substrate.

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Obtaining Metal Seeds from Harmless Solvents with a Metallorganic Suspension

       Metal seeds are particularly important for circuit repair
and for the design of circuits where localized or patterned metal is
used to circuitize.  Pd-acetate pyrolyzed with a laser to form a thin
layer of Pd has been used extensively for this purpose.  Generally,
solutions of Pd-acetate are made with solvents, such as chloroform, a
solvent in which the Pd-acetate readily dissolves.  However, due to
the toxicity of chloroform, as well as the toxicity of a number of
other commonly used organic solvents, there exists a need for less
harmful solvents.  We have found that ethanol can be used to form a
suspension of Pd- acetate which can be applied in droplet form or
sprayed onto a substrate. Pyrolysis of this air-dried suspension
gives rise to an electrically continuous metal (Pd) film onto which
copper can be deposited to complete the repair of an open copper
microcircuit.  Thus, we claim the novel and unexpected result of
using a suspension, rather than a homogeneous solution, to obtain
continuous seed layers onto which copper can be deposited.  The
copper deposition can be achieved by one of any number of schemes,
such as electroplating or self-induced repair (SIR).  Using SIR (*)
we have repaired open copper circuits on glass epoxy boards, starting
with pyrolyzed Pd from a suspension of Pd-acetate/ethanol.  After the
SIR copper deposition step, the repaired sections were found t...