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New Electrode Material for Cold Nuclear Fusion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108532D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lechaton, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Cold nuclear fusion has been reported to occur in solid palladium at high solubility concentrations of deuterium in both electrolytic and gas cells. It is felt that the rapid decrease in deuterium solubility above 75oC (1) would make sustained fusion at low temperatures difficult. To circumvent this problem, an improved electrode material with high solubility of deuterium at temperatures up to 800oC is proposed.

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New Electrode Material for Cold Nuclear Fusion

       Cold nuclear fusion has been reported to occur in solid
palladium at high solubility concentrations of deuterium in both
electrolytic and gas cells.  It is felt that the rapid decrease in
deuterium solubility above 75oC (1) would make sustained fusion at
low temperatures difficult.  To circumvent this problem, an improved
electrode material with high solubility of deuterium at temperatures
up to 800oC is proposed.

      The pioneering cold fusion experiments, first reported by
Fleischman and Pons, describe an electrolytic cell in which the
negative electrode is palladium and the electrolytic solution is
heavy water (D20) containing some inorganic salts.  The current
generated in the cell causes the deuterium to diffuse into the Pd
electrode, where in close proximity and under the influence of the
strong lattice fields, the deuterons fuse.  For this to be a useful
process, however, the deuterium must remain dissolved in the
palladium over a useful temperature range, e.g., > 100oC. At
temperatures above 75oC, however, degassing of the palladium will
rapidly occur.  See Fig. 1.

      Electrodes made of zirconium or hafnium will overcome this
problem.  These materials retain a high solid solubility of hydrogen,
and hence deuterium, at temperatures exceeding 800oC (2).  Fig. 2
shows that the hydrogen (deuterium) solubility decreases only
slightly with temperature, therefore enhancing the likelihood of
su...