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Browse Prior Art Database

High Pressure Electron Spectroscopy/Lithography

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108543D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greschner, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The described method permits analyzing substrate surfaces by means of electron beams at normal atmospheric pressures.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

High Pressure Electron Spectroscopy/Lithography

       The described method permits analyzing substrate surfaces
by means of electron beams at normal atmospheric pressures.

      Electron spectroscopy for surface analysis is a high-vacuum
method because of the small range of the electrons in the material to
be analyzed.  This applies to known SEM (scanning electron
microscope), SAM (scanning Auger microscope), XPS (X-ray
photoemission spectroscopy), UPS (ultraviolet photoelectron
spectroscopy) methods, and many others.  The gap in the pressure
range, for instance, for technical catalysis using pressures
exceeding 100 atmospheres, amounts to powers of ten.  There is
presently no in situ method for analyzing surfaces by electron
spectroscopy at technically interesting pressures of 1 bar.

      The new method is described by way of SEM, meaning that any of
the details given are analogously applicable to other comparable
methods.  The boundary area between the high vacuum of the electron
microscope and the environment of the probe to be analyzed is assumed
to be a very small jet opening with a diameter of less than 1 mm.
This opening is positioned closely adjacent (less than 1 mm) to the
sample, so that the electron beam travelling that distance is not
noticeably attenuated.  The jet's conical angle must be such that gas
molecules and emitted electrons reach the vacuum unimpeded (see
figure).

      For a jet with an opening of 1 x 1 mm2 = 10-8 cm2,
the...