Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Shut-Down Control for Fax-Equipped Personal Computer Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108571D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wade, JA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a software-controlled mechanism to automatically shut-down and control facsimile (FAX) input ports of personal computer (PC) systems so as to prevent a loss of data should disk storage capacity be in danger of being exceeded.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Automatic Shut-Down Control for Fax-Equipped Personal Computer Systems

       Described is a software-controlled mechanism to
automatically shut-down and control facsimile (FAX) input ports of
personal computer (PC) systems so as to prevent a loss of data should
disk storage capacity be in danger of being exceeded.

      Typically, the utilization of FAX to receive documentation
involves the reception of many documents from several ports for
storage into a system storage device, such as a fixed disk.  As a
result, a documentation build-up within the system storage device can
occur in that the capacity of the storage device will be exceeded
without the user's knowledge, causing a loss of data.

      The concept described herein is designed to prevent the loss of
data by providing a controlled mechanism that automatically
shuts-down the FAX device if the capacity of the storage device is in
danger of being exceeded.  In addition, the concept provides a means
of controlling the number of FAX input ports that should be
operational in the event the capacity of the storage device is in
danger of reaching its maximum storage capacity.  A phased, or
incremental, feature dictates the number of FAX input ports that can
be active in receiving data and is based on the amount of storage
available.  The mechanism allows the user to specify the number of
phases to be used and controlled.

      In prior art, at the end of a received FAX document, the FAX
circuitry was not available to another caller until the document was
uploaded to a host system, then the document was erased from the
storage device of the PC system.  In this way, room was made to allow
the reception of the next document.  Only one document per input port
was stored in the PC system storage device at any one time. This can
be referred to as a one-document-per-port restriction.  However, this
type of implementation caused excessive delays to occur so another
prior art approach was implemented to allow more than one document to
be stored in the PC system rather than uploading to a host.
Although this maximized the utilization of the FAX op...