Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Instrument Digital Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108614D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Medan, Y: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a technique for abstracting and generalizing the well known musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) protocol to encompass visual information, in addition to audio data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Visual Instrument Digital Interface

       This article describes a technique for abstracting and
generalizing the well known musical instrument digital interface
(MIDI) protocol to encompass visual information, in addition to audio
data.

      The visual instrument digital interface (VIDI) protocol defines
a spatio-temporal display process of visual information, based on
visual primitives.  These primitives can be mapped into the existing
musical primitives in MIDI. Thus, it allows to orchestrate in a
unified manner the process of playing Audio/Visual (A/V) information.
Moreover, by providing a mapping between visual and musical domain
parameters, this process enables an artistic visual interpretation of
existing MIDI streams.

      The motivation for the disclosed concept stems from the fact
that there exist numerous ways of encoding color visual information
in a digital form for display purposes.  This includes controls such
as the following:
1.   Color space - YUV, YIQ, RGB (direct) or CLUT (indirect)
2.   Display Resolution - NTSC, I/E/HDTV, C/E/VGA
3.   Image size - Partial/Full frame
4.   Refresh rate - 60 Hz NTSC, 50Hz PAL
5.   Frame rate - 30/25/24 Hz
6.   Interlacing - None, 2 Fields, Stereo

      A protocol that allows control of the presentation process of a
given visual object in a desired manner, rather than limiting the
display process to a rigid subset of the presentation space, is
useful.  To a large extent, this is what MIDI is striving to achieve.
Rather than have a single way of presenting music by a particular
instanciation (e.g., recording), the presentation process is defined
by a sequence of presentation controls that govern the timbre, tempo,
loudness, duration and the variety of musical sources that...