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Browse Prior Art Database

Solvent for Cleaning High Transition Temperature Superconductor Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108633D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feild, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The reactivity of the high temperature superconductors with most known solvents is a major problem. This means that there are limited procedures for cleaning the surface of samples, particularly single crystals. The properties of samples are seriously affected by the adherence of residual flux or second phase material because of effects on the homogeneity of the material as a whole, giving rise to a broadening of the superconducting transition. We have found a new solvent which removes flux and attached satellite crystals from crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-w, sharpening the superconducting transition width but not affecting the superconducting properties.

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Solvent for Cleaning High Transition Temperature Superconductor Surfaces

       The reactivity of the high temperature superconductors
with most known solvents is a major problem.  This means that there
are limited procedures for cleaning the surface of samples,
particularly single crystals.  The properties of samples are
seriously affected by the adherence of residual flux or second phase
material because of effects on the homogeneity of the material as a
whole, giving rise to a broadening of the superconducting transition.
We have found a new solvent which removes flux and attached satellite
crystals from crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-w, sharpening the superconducting
transition width but not affecting the superconducting properties.

      Crystals of 123 with flux and a crystal of CuO on the surface
were submerged in a 70-30 mixture of ethyl alcohol and glycerine for
7 days to determine whether the sample would degrade.  It was then
removed and the remaining adhering surface material was easily
removed with a swab made of soft filter paper.  The sample was rinsed
in absolute alcohol and dried.  The figure shows the AC
susceptibility measured after the cleaning process demonstrating that
the sample quality has not been compromised by the cleaning process.
The surface of the crystal retained its high reflectivity, appearing
not to have suffered degradation during cleaning.  We have found the
surface to lose reflectivity with the perchlorate etch (1). A bromine
etha...