Browse Prior Art Database

Stack Received Pages Capability for Advanced Function Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108647D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 124K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stone, DE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is disclosed for use within the Intelligent Printer Data Stream (IPDS) to command a printer to process all received pages and to move the last received page to the printer's output stacker. This method allows a print driver program, such as Print Services Facilities (PSF), to accurately move all received pages to the printer's output stacker.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Stack Received Pages Capability for Advanced Function Printers

       A method is disclosed for use within the Intelligent
Printer Data Stream (IPDS) to command a printer to process all
received pages and to move the last received page to the printer's
output stacker.  This method allows a print driver program, such as
Print Services Facilities (PSF), to accurately move all received
pages to the printer's output stacker.

      IPDS provides many commands which allow a host computer program
to control the actions of a printer.  Most continuous-form IPDS
printers have the capability to move the most recently printed page
to the output stacker; this is normally initiated through the press
of a button by the printer operator.  This function is commonly
called non-process runout.

      Many versions of PSF programs contain extraordinary code to
force stack all pages which have been sent to a continuous-forms
printer.  As part of the PSF normal shut-down procedure, PSF has
responsibility for ensuring that all pages sent to the printer are
safely deposited in the stacker.  Some PSFs are required to force
stack pages when no other documents are available for printing and a
specified time period has elapsed.  Some PSFs also force stack pages
when a printer is flushed to change to a new form.

      One method of accomplishing force stacking is to issue an Eject
to Font Facing (EFF) order followed by a Print Buffered Data (PBD)
order with an acknowledgement request.  The committed page counter
and the stacked page counter returned in the acknowledgement are then
compared.  If they are not the same, the host sends some number of
blank pages to the printer in order to push the committed pages to
the stacker.  Note that an exception, such as as a paper jam, could
occur on a blank page which the host generated to force stack the
pages in the printer.  This causes the host to generate error
recovery for these blank pages.

      This software generated force stack has the following problems:
           -    Assumptions have to be made about paper path lengths.
           -    Media can be of different lengths.
           -    Extra (blank) pages may be printed.
           -    The printer hardware is started and stopped several
times.

      Most PSF products currently are designed to send one or more
blank data stream pages at a time.  If one blank page at a time is
sent, the hardware starts and stops on every page, which is not good
for the hardware.  If multiple pages are sent, then paper is wasted
unless the paper path length happens to be the same as the total
length of the pages sent.

      The number of blank pages that have to be sent depends on the
length of a physical page for the currently mounted forms (as
returned in the Obtain Printer Characteristics reply) and the
physical length of the p...