Browse Prior Art Database

Deferred Processing of Facsimile Scanned Mail Pieces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108648D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rosenbaum, WS: AUTHOR

Abstract

An extension is disclosed of the deferred processing mail automation scheme described in U.S. Patent 5,031,223. This extension can achieve additional efficiency as well as further reduce the number of manual mail handlings prior to client delivery. Additional benefits in this mail processing scheme include: - automatic facing of mail pieces; - validation/debiting of prepaid postage account balance on a mail piece by mail piece basis; and - eliminate the need for real-time OCR reader equipment.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Deferred Processing of Facsimile Scanned Mail Pieces

       An extension is disclosed of the deferred processing mail
automation scheme described in U.S. Patent 5,031,223.  This extension
can achieve additional efficiency as well as further reduce the
number of manual mail handlings prior to client delivery.  Additional
benefits in this mail processing scheme include:
      -    automatic facing of mail pieces;
      -    validation/debiting of prepaid postage account balance on
a mail piece by mail piece basis; and
      -    eliminate the need for real-time OCR reader equipment.

      Currently, the processing of mail is accomplished by a series
of sorting steps.  The first sorting accomplishes outgoing
destination determination and is done at a Mail Sorting Facility
(MSF).  At the MSF are clustered special equipment to perform mail
sorting.  Such equipment includes OCR Address Readers, bar code
readers and multi-pocket sort machines.  The most expensive piece of
equipment is the OCR Address Reader.  Mail arrives at an MSF in the
early evening after being collected from boxes and Large Volume
Mailers (LVM) and is held for several hours at local post offices.
No sorting of outgoing mail is performed at the local post office.
This article allows mail sorting to start at the local post office
level (the first instance of collection) without disrupting the
existing MSF role of outgoing clearinghouse.

      The technical approach being disclosed involves facsimile
scanning the front and back of each envelope as soon as possible
after collection.  In terms of practical state-of-the-art, the
scanning and image capture would most likely happen at the local post
office where mail normally waits several hours before transit to the
MSF.

      Using pattern recognition logic, an instantaneous decision is
made between the two scans to determine which is of the front and
which is of the reverse side of the envelope.  The front of the
envelope can normally be readily distinguished from the reverse side
based...