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Browse Prior Art Database

Monitor Brightness Alignment Image

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108680D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edgar, AD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The test image of this disclosure is used to objectively adjust an image monitor. The image has three zones for pure black, gray, and pure white. A faint pattern modulates equally over all three zones. The user adjusts the monitor so the pattern clarity is balanced in the three zones. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Monitor Brightness Alignment Image

       The test image of this disclosure is used to objectively
adjust an image monitor.  The image has three zones for pure black,
gray, and pure white.  A faint pattern modulates equally over all
three zones.  The user adjusts the monitor so the pattern clarity is
balanced in the three zones.

                            (Image Omitted)

      Adjustment of multimedia monitors, particularly at an image
capture station, is one of the most critical and most ignored factors
in producing high-quality uniform work.

      In the past, brightness adjustment of a monitor has been
largely subjective, or has required special photosensitive hardware.
This was a less serious problem in the past where the user was either
adjusting a personal monitor to personal taste for viewing
"published" images, or was creating those images in a studio where
the special photosensitive hardware was practical.  With computerized
image creation moving onto the desktop, there is a growing need for
an economical yet objective means of adjusting monitors to a
standard.

      This article describes an image with which a novice may
objectively adjust a monitor.  The image has three concentric boxes
that are pure black, pure white, and 50% gray.  A faint pattern
overlays these boxes.  Unlike a gray scale that requires the user to
estimate when black is dark enough to be called black, the faint
pattern shows the viewer the rate of change of brightness by the
intensity of the pattern.  The pattern may be slightly stronger in
the black box.

      The pattern will be most clearly seen in the gray area because
it is on the straightline part of the monitor brightness curve.  In
most monitors, the pattern in the white square will be on a very long
shoulder and so will be a little fainter.  Some studio monitors
sharply saturate in the white, whi...