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Browse Prior Art Database

Sequence Number Determination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108692D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lennon, CJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a methodology by which a sequence of data files can be generated and named in a multitasking operating system environment. This methodology provides a file naming scheme that provides chronological ordering of the files and assures no file is overlayed if two files need to be created at the same time. Furthermore, this file naming scheme is preserved across operating system boots.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Sequence Number Determination

       Disclosed is a methodology by which a sequence of data
files can be generated and named in a multitasking operating system
environment.  This methodology provides a file naming scheme that
provides chronological ordering of the files and assures no file is
overlayed if two files need to be created at the same time.
Furthermore, this file naming scheme is preserved across operating
system boots.

      In the computing environment today, there is often a need to
archive data and hold it for a specific amount of time.  With this
storage of data comes the problem of file management, especially the
"cleanup" of old files.  Most often, this is a manual process.  To
handle this situation, many users turn to a file naming scheme that
uses a sequence number as the suffix of a file name.  Then when a
predetermined maximum number of files are created in the series, the
sequence number is reset and the oldest file is replaced with the
next newly created file.  The next number used is taken from an
integer stored in memory.

      An example of this would be a series of application dump files.
The user indicates that there should never be more than 32 dump files
on the user's disk.  The dump files are named using the scheme
'DUMPxxxx' where 'xxxx' is a sequence number.  The first file
generated will be DUMP0001 and the next DUMP0002.  After DUMP0032 is
generated, the next file name would be DUMP0001 which would overlay
the previous DUMP0001 file, the oldest dump file.

      There are two problems that the authors of this paper found
with this scheme.  First, the next-in-sequence value is lost across
operating system reboots.  Second, in a multita...