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MVS Editable Format Conversion to PC ASCII

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108747D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dickens, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for converting an MVS editable format file to PC ASCII. Integration of host-based and PC-based applications require that data be converted from the host EBCDIC format to the PC ASCII format. Host MVS systems (OV/MVS, for example) carry data in a variable length format. The length is at the front of the record and the data line follows. PC-based data assumes data whose line length is determined by carriage return and line feed characters at the end of the line. Conversion of the host-based data is made on the PC a line at a time using code page conversion tables. This is very inefficient, and reduces performance.

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MVS Editable Format Conversion to PC ASCII

       This article describes a technique for converting an MVS
editable format file to PC ASCII.  Integration of host-based and
PC-based applications require that data be converted from the host
EBCDIC format to the PC ASCII format.  Host MVS systems (OV/MVS, for
example) carry data in a variable length format.  The length is at
the front of the record and the data line follows.  PC-based data
assumes data whose line length is determined by carriage return and
line feed characters at the end of the line.  Conversion of the
host-based data is made on the PC a line at a time using code page
conversion tables.  This is very inefficient, and reduces
performance.

      Reformat the host data by eliminating the length field and
inserting carriage control and line feed characters at the end.  Then
convert the entire data stream at once (multiple lines) using the
code page conversion table.  This simplifies the task involved in the
conversion, and reduces the amount of time by an order of magnitude.
The carriage control and the line feed characters are not corrupted.
This is because while conversion of characters from EBCDIC to ASCII
results in different code points, the code points placed at the end
of each line will be the ones that will convert to the proper ASCII
carriage control and line feeds when the entire data stream is
converted.

      Conversion time required for download of data from the host to
the PC w...