Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Routing, Distribution, and Printing of Facsimile Documents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108812D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 149K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griefer, AD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In any organization that uses facsimile (fax) for electronic transmission of documents, there is a need to route them to a particular user or area.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Automatic Routing, Distribution, and Printing of Facsimile Documents

       In any organization that uses facsimile (fax) for
electronic transmission of documents, there is a need to route them
to a particular user or area.

      This article describes an automated system for routing,
distribution, and printing of fax documents based on Direct Inward
Dial (DID) telephone trunk signalling protocols.

      An important task with any fax system used by more than one
person is the distribution of the incoming fax to the intended person
or area.  In a traditional fax machine environment, a secretary or
mail room employee receives fax copy on a standard fax machine and
routes the fax to the addressee based on address information
contained within the fax document.  In a networked computer
environment, some user or administrator is allowed to look at all
received faxes on their video display terminal and enter routing data
based on address information contained within the fax document.

      This invention improves on previous methods because it is fully
automatic.  No human intervention is required prior to delivering the
fax to the final destination, which may be a file accessible by the
user or to a printer specified by the user.

      Direct Inward Dial (DID) trunks are special incoming-only
telephone lines used to provide called party address information to a
terminal.  In this case a terminal is defined as an item of
telecommunications equipment that receives a call, either as the
final destination or a relay point in the telecommunications system.
A common use of a DID trunk is to deliver incoming telephone calls to
a Private Branch Exchange (PBX) system located on the telephone
customer's premises.  An example of a PBX is sold by the Rolm
Corporation of Santa Clara, California.  DID trunks provide PBX with
the called party's extension number, permitting it to route the call
to the correct telephone instrument.  DID trunks are the key device
that allows customers to have multiple telephone numbers, but
relatively few actual telephone lines.

      A customer may have one or more DID trunks.  In the case of
multiple trunks, calls a...