Browse Prior Art Database

OS/2 2.0 Message Symbol Family

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108820D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 145K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Luszcz, W: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The challenge was to design a cohesive, implementable, quality symbol family which visually communicates the nature of the system message. The message symbols must maintain their priority in the visual hierarchy of the interface and to communicate to international users. They must clearly communicate their own hierarchy, with the most urgent communicating it is more important than the other symbols in the family, without appearing separate from the group. As seen in Fig. 2, the symbol family has been designed as follows: Help message: International Information symbol - Blue Caution message: International Caution sign - Teal Query: Question Mark - Green Critical: International Do Not Sign - Red

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

OS/2 2.0 Message Symbol Family

       The challenge was to design a cohesive, implementable,
quality symbol family which visually communicates the nature of the
system message.  The message symbols must maintain their priority in
the visual hierarchy of the interface and to communicate to
international users.  They must clearly communicate their own
hierarchy, with the most urgent communicating it is more important
than the other symbols in the family, without appearing separate from
the group.  As seen in Fig. 2, the symbol family has been designed as
follows:
      Help message: International Information symbol - Blue
      Caution message: International Caution sign - Teal
      Query: Question Mark - Green
      Critical: International Do Not Sign - Red

      The rendering of these symbols is the core of this article.
Though three of these symbols are international symbols, the choices
of these particular symbols, the pixel placement in their design and
color choices are critical to their communication of their hierarchy
and as a family of themselves and within the interface.

      The three non-critical messages (Info, Caution and Query) are
cool, non-threatening colors, the white space is balanced with the
color, and the symbols are comprised of two parts, a colored shape
and an understated white symbol -- a two-word sentence, if you will,
which takes a little longer to visually digest.  The white shapes are
designed to be about the same visual weight, and to flow easily from
one to the next, not bringing attention to any in that aspect.

      Of the three less critical messages, the caution message is the
onl...