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Strengthening Lead Tin Solder by Adding Fine Powder of Nickel Tin Intermetallic Phases

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108837D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kang, SK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article discloses a new method of strengthening lead-tin solder by adding fine powder of nickel-tin intermetallic compounds. Several attempts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of lead-tin solder alloys by adding Mo or Ta powders (1), copper-coated carbon fibers (2), Cu/Sn intermetallic powder (3), and Ni metal (4). In the study of the nickel-alloyed solder (4), it was found that the small amount of nickel added was precipitated out in the solder matrix as a fine dispersion of nickel-tin intermetallics, such as Ni3Sn4 . However, this fine dispersion is only possible when the solidification rate is fast, for example, at the rate of 100 C/sec or higher.

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Strengthening Lead Tin Solder by Adding Fine Powder of Nickel Tin Intermetallic Phases

       This article discloses a new method of strengthening
lead-tin solder by adding fine powder of nickel-tin intermetallic
compounds. Several attempts have been made to improve the mechanical
properties of lead-tin solder alloys by adding Mo or Ta powders (1),
copper-coated carbon fibers (2), Cu/Sn intermetallic powder (3), and
Ni metal (4).  In the study of the nickel-alloyed solder (4), it was
found that the small amount of nickel added was precipitated out in
the solder matrix as a fine dispersion of nickel-tin intermetallics,
such as Ni3Sn4 .  However, this fine dispersion is only possible when
the solidification rate is fast, for example, at the rate of 100
C/sec or higher.  When the solidification rate of the molten solder
is slow, the nickel/tin intermetallic phases are precipitated as
large plates or aggregates, which are rather harmful to the
mechanical properties of the solders.  Therefore, the production of
the desirable Ni-alloyed solder is very much dependent upon the
solidification condition of the molten solder.

      Here, we disclose a new method of adding a fine powder of
nickel/tin compounds to lead/tin solders.  First a mixture of nickel
and tin metals with a desired composition, such as Ni3Sn4, is melted
in a high temperature furnace with a protective atmosphere.  Then the
cast compound alloy is broken into smaller pieces, and they are
further pulve...