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Frictionless, Noiseless Bearings utilizing Superconductive Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108856D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Winstead, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

The bearings described are very useful for rotational or pivotal applications which currently suffer from noisy, dirty, vibrating, conventional bearings. One such application is computer disk drives. The idea described herein consists of a superconductive armature or shaft which is held away from the other part of the bearing which is a magnet. The Meissner effect describes the mechanism by which this can happen; the magnetic field is excluded from the superconductor, thereby forcing the superconductive armature to "float" or remain some small distance from the applied magnetic field(s). Due to the three-dimensional shapes of the cups and rod, the bearing thus constructed can support both radial and axial loads. The areas and field intensity must be appropriate for for the design loads.

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Frictionless, Noiseless Bearings utilizing Superconductive Materials

      The bearings described are very useful for rotational or
pivotal applications which currently suffer from noisy, dirty,
vibrating, conventional bearings.  One such application is computer
disk drives.  The idea described herein consists of a superconductive
armature or shaft which is held away from the other part of the
bearing which is a magnet.  The Meissner effect describes the
mechanism by which this can happen; the magnetic field is excluded
from the superconductor, thereby forcing the superconductive armature
to "float" or remain some small distance from the applied magnetic
field(s).  Due to the three-dimensional shapes of the cups and rod,
the bearing thus constructed can support both radial and axial loads.
The areas and field intensity must be appropriate for for the design
loads.

      The shape of the armature and the magnetic portions of the
bearings is important.  The basic shapes used are a cup and rod which
fits into the opening of the cup.  The cup is typically the magnetic
element and the rod is typically the superconductive element of the
bearing assembly.  The rod is ideally contained at both ends by the
cup-shaped magnetic elements.  Thus, the rod is suspended between two
magnetic fields which constantly repel the rod to a center
equilibrium position.  The shapes described above are simple and only
meant to be representative of any three-dimensional magnetic
fie...