Browse Prior Art Database

Adjustable Device Chip Encapsulation Flow Simulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108876D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ellerson, JV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a unique and adjustable device by which chip encapsulation flow patterns can be monitored. Encapsulation material is placed near the edge of a transparent chip, capillary action pulls the material through the gap between the carrier and the chip. These small gaps provide a challenge since the material must penetrate and surround the chip to substrate solder connections. A delicate balance between material properties and dispense technique must be achieved to obtain the desired results. In addition, it becomes critical with respect to engineering and design, to understand how the materials react when very small planar and non-planar gaps are introduced into the flow area. Design for carriers and chip footprints can be aided, adjusted and improved by studying the resulting flow patterns. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Adjustable Device Chip Encapsulation Flow Simulator

      Disclosed is a unique and adjustable device by which chip
encapsulation flow patterns can be monitored.  Encapsulation material
is placed near the edge of a transparent chip, capillary action pulls
the material through the gap between the carrier and the chip.  These
small gaps provide a challenge since the material must penetrate and
surround the chip to substrate solder connections.  A delicate
balance between material properties and dispense technique must be
achieved to obtain the desired results.  In addition, it becomes
critical with respect to engineering and design, to understand how
the materials react when very small planar and non-planar gaps are
introduced into the flow area. Design for carriers and chip
footprints can be aided, adjusted and improved by studying the
resulting flow patterns.

                            (Image Omitted)

      A small bead of encapsulating material is placed along any one
to four sides of the chip (1).  Planarity of the glass chip (1) to
the carrier (2) is controlled by small plastic or metal shims (3)
placed just under the corners of the chip.  The chip (1) is secured
to the shim (2) and the shim (2) is secured to the carrier (3) by
very small amounts of adhesive (4).

      Disclosed anonymously.