Browse Prior Art Database

Cable Strain Relief

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108951D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Guzman, AM: AUTHOR

Abstract

There is a requirement that fiber-optic cables for signal transmission be strain-relieved to withstand large pull forces as they exit the "box" to which they are attached. Also, the cables cannot be bent below a certain minimum radius, and their cover can vary widely in stiffness and friction coefficient. In general, these cables are fragile.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

Cable Strain Relief

       There is a requirement that fiber-optic cables for signal
transmission be strain-relieved to withstand large pull forces as
they exit the "box" to which they are attached.  Also, the cables
cannot be bent below a certain minimum radius, and their cover can
vary widely in stiffness and friction coefficient.  In general, these
cables are fragile.

      The invention consists of a housing and a cap (see the figure).
The housing has a circular channel 1 having a width of one cable
diameter and a depth of two cable diameters.  The channel has a cable
entrance 2 which accepts the low tension part of the cable, and an
exit 3 which supports the high tension part of the cable.

      The cable exit has a "bell mouth" shape following the profile
of a toroid surface.  This divergent curvature has the minimum radius
that the cable can be safely bent at.  The exit is where the large
tensile load can be applied to the cable from any direction and up to
a 90-degree angle.

      The channel also has a series of axial ribs on both side walls
4, the ribs are of a certain shape, height and spacing as to be of
utmost importance in increasing the friction between the housing and
the cable by a very large factor.

      On the outside of the exit there are two indentations 5 to mate
with two "hooks" from the cap.  The housing also has a snapping
friction latch 6 which, in conjunction with the indentations, are
used to hold the cap securely...