Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Reducing Software Complexity in Pointing Device And/Or Key Board Simulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000108971D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Henson Jr, JD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to greatly reduce the complexity of a simulator tool in dealing with "commands" from the host to the device being simulated.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method of Reducing Software Complexity in Pointing Device And/Or Key Board Simulation

       Disclosed is a method to greatly reduce the complexity of
a simulator tool in dealing with "commands" from the host to the
device being simulated.

      There is a test tool that simulates keyboards and pointer
devices (mouse) on the PC host system.  Normal operation of these
devices involves sending scan-codes (an electronic code) to the host
when the human operator depresses a key or moves the mouse.  Also
associated with this is the device's ability to respond to 'commands'
from the host.  These architected 'commands' indicate such things are
reset during IPL or to turn on/off the indicator lights on the IBM PC
AT* keyboard.  The host will not operate correctly unless it receives
correct responses to these commands.  This communicating interface is
referred to herein as 'talkback'.  For a simulation tool that
replaces the keyboard/mouse, these 'commands' must be handled
correctly.  When this tool is in drive mode, all of the scan-codes
are originated by the tool and given to the host and, thus, simulate
keyboard/mouse activity.

      Prior models of this tool contained a serializer/deserializer
(SERDES) card that did the interface between the tool and the PC
host.  It was a total simulator and had to properly respond to any
host talkback commands.  When new commands were introduced in the
driver hosts, it required a change in the tool's SERDES card to
support the new function.  It required an extensive set of microcode
logic on the SERDES card to handle this interface exchange.  With the
implementation of the new Intelligent Response Interface Element
(IRIE) card, this interface exchange was simplified and designed to
handle future needs with no change to the IRIE card or microcode in
it.

      The design of the IRIE card is such that it is a 'monitor' box
place...