Browse Prior Art Database

(Cellular) Telephone Steno Captioning Service

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109030D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 4 page(s) / 174K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

De Gennaro, S: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Currently stenographers are used for different types of services. Most often they are used to produce soft/hard copies of oral messages that were conveyed during court sessions, meetings, or during dictations. Recently they started also to be used to perform real time captioning of oral presentations for the hearing impaired.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 37% of the total text.

(Cellular) Telephone Steno Captioning Service

       Currently stenographers are used for different types of
services.  Most often they are used to produce soft/hard copies of
oral messages that were conveyed during court sessions, meetings, or
during dictations.  Recently they started also to be used to perform
real time captioning of oral presentations for the hearing impaired.

      To perform all these services stenographers arrive personally
to places where events are occurring and perform their work on
special stenotyping machines.  While typing stenographers produce
phonetic utterances that are translated into words by special
programs and can be displayed on panels for observing by interested
persons.  Stenographers are capable of typing 200 words per minute.
Because of this high speed of production of words in many cases
(courts, interpretation for the hard-of-hearing) steno-typing is the
only possible alternative to satisfy user requirements.  Inherent
difficulties of learning the stenotyping lead to shortages in a
steno-labor market and, as consequence, to the high cost of the
stenographer work.  The cost of stenographer work includes also the
time that stenographer should spend to come for their place of work.
Since there are not enough stenographers to satisfy all user
requirements, sometimes the stenographers available at a given time
need to come from very far, and even fly from different states and
cities.  This situation is especially unfavorable when stenographers
are needed to transcribe short meetings or generate comparatively
small amount of text.

      Here the above problem is addressed by considering access to a
stenographer via a (cellular) telephone.

      The problem could be resolved if stenographers could be
accessed over (cellular) telephones.  This setup should include the
following features:
1.   If the immediate reproduction of the translation of a
stenographer's utterance is required, a user and a stenographer
should be connected by a link that transmits both voice and textual
information.  This link can consists either of two (cellular) phone
lines or one line with a multiplexer and demultiplexer for
transmitting both modem and voice information over the same line.  If
soft or hard copy can be sent at a later time, the (cellular) phone
link can consist of one line only that transmits only voice data. The
textual data can be sent later, either via another link or by mail.
2.   On one end the (cellular) telephone is connected to a special
microphone that can pick up voices from large distances and to a
terminal (e.g., a laptop) for transmitting this voice signal from the
microphone and ASCII characters to the laptop correspondingly.
3.   On the other end the telephone link is connected to a
stenographer telephone and computer facilities (for translation of
stenoutterances) and modem (for transmitting a textual data over the
(cellular) phone line).  A stenographer must also...