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Visual Design Move/ Copy Function

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109031D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Redpath, SD: AUTHOR

Abstract

This design details unique interface visual aids for the move/copy function. Under some systems, upon dragging a selection icon, the pointer turns into a duplicate copy of the selected icon. In this solution, the icon remains unmoved until the user deselects, having placed the pointer in a chosen place. During the function, there appear two versions of the icon: one in its original place, and one, which is now the pointer, moving around the screen. It could easily appear to the user that there are now two objects and that the user has really made a copy, but in actuality he or she did not. A visual distinction is needed to separate "moving" an object from "copying" an object.

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Visual Design Move/ Copy Function

       This design details unique interface visual aids for the
move/copy function.  Under some systems, upon dragging a selection
icon, the pointer turns into a duplicate copy of the selected icon.
In this solution, the icon remains unmoved until the user deselects,
having placed the pointer in a chosen place.  During the function,
there appear two versions of the icon:  one in its original place,
and one, which is now the pointer, moving around the screen.  It
could easily appear to the user that there are now two objects and
that the user has really made a copy, but in actuality he or she did
not.  A visual distinction is needed to separate "moving" an object
from "copying" an object.

      The solution follows:  A selected object which the user intends
to move becomes half-toned (see Fig. 1).  It remains stationary to
communicate to the user that the object will not move until he has
deselected it.  It is half-toned to communicate to the user that he
has invoked the move function.  In addition, an object known as the
"drag" visual aid becomes attached to the narrow pointer.  The object
is a one-pel outline of the selected object.  This emphasizes to the
user that he has grabbed the correct object and is in the process of
selecting a new place for it.  The object will not actually be moved
until he deselects it.  By maintaining the cursor arrow in
combination with the drag visual aid, the user does not lose his "ho...