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Method to Centralize Maintenance Activity of a Performance Database

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109035D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 5 page(s) / 178K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wang, PC: AUTHOR

Abstract

The performance data of a database system is collected chronologically into a set of files in real time, and then the data in these files is stored into a performance database off-line. Each file contains some types of performance data collected for a certain period of time. The data in each file will be stored into a set of tables of the performance database.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 36% of the total text.

Method to Centralize Maintenance Activity of a Performance Database

       The performance data of a database system is collected
chronologically into a set of files in real time, and then the data
in these files is stored into a performance database off-line.  Each
file contains some types of performance data collected for a certain
period of time.  The data in each file will be stored into a set of
tables of the performance database.

      As the collected performance data becomes old and obsolete, it
has to be deleted from the performance database to save storage space
and enable faster retrieval.  However, this task is very cumbersome
and error prone.  Different types of data has different effective
periods and get stored into different set of tables.  In our
environment, a type of data typically spreads across between 5 to 14
tables.  The database administrator needs to identify those obsolete
data, their type, expiration collection period and the set of
associated tables.  Then, for each obsolete data type, there will be
a delete statement issued against each associated table.  This means
that the database administrator will have to constantly view all
tables in the performance database to identify and delete the
obsolete data.  If this maintenance activity can be centralized and
confined within a single table, the maintenance overhead can be
greatly reduced for the database administrator.  This article
provides such a solution.
BACKGROUND

                            (Image Omitted)

      For the system depicted above, the performance data is
collected via a set of collection commands (i.e., SAMPLE COMMAND,
EVENT MONITOR COMMANDS) and stored into files in real time.  Later,
the information in these files will be stored into the performance
database off-line using 'STORE' command.  A database system
administrator can then use SQL query to generate performance reports
from the performance database.  The advantage of using a database to
store performance data is 'better organized information' and 'more
flexible reports'.  The reason to store the collected performance
data into an intermediate file first before putting it into the
performance database is to minimize the overhead imposed on the
database system during the collection in real time, since writing
data to a file is much faster than inserting records into database.

      There are two different type of files, SAMPLING and EVENT
MONITOR.  Each file contains a set of collections which cover
different collection periods.  The performance database has 24 tables
divided into four major parts:
      1.   Summary Statistics Part-- contains 6 tables.
      2.   Event Raw Data Part-- contains 8 tables.
      3.   Trend Analysis Part-- contains 3 tables.
      4.   Snapshot Raw Data Part-- contains 5 tables.

      Each part corresponds to one data type.

      The data contained in a collect...