Browse Prior Art Database

Fully Digital GML Based Authoring and Delivery System for Hypermedia

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109088D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 6 page(s) / 255K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Iantosca, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system that combines various elements of electronic publishing, including tag-based text authoring and retrieval programs, hypertext, digital multimedia, and optical storage, to easily author, revise, and distribute large hypermedia documents.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 32% of the total text.

Fully Digital GML Based Authoring and Delivery System for Hypermedia

       Disclosed is a system that combines various elements of
electronic publishing, including tag-based text authoring and
retrieval programs, hypertext, digital multimedia, and optical
storage, to easily author, revise, and distribute large hypermedia
documents.

      When people discovered the need for technical documentation,
they turned first to the printed word.  For years, retrieving
information meant paging through reams of paper documents, using only
the text and sparse graphics to interpret often complex instructions
and ideas.

      Little changed until the development of computer-based training
and the evolution of audiovisual aids.  With these, users could see
tasks being done, visualize vague ideas, hear detailed instructions,
and sometimes, interact with the information and control its flow.

      Eventually, softcopy documentation, or electronic books,
provided digital access to information traditionally found only in
hardcopy manuals.  With softcopy also emerged electronic navigation,
such as hypertext, which provides nonsequential access within or
between softcopy documents.

      Independent of softcopy has been the recent emergence of
workstation-based multimedia technologies that support the authoring
and delivery of interactive multimedia, including audio, video,
animation and graphics.  With off-the-shelf software and hardware,
virtually anyone can create and distribute sophisticated multimedia
applications.  Compact distribution media, such as CD-ROM, provide
the high-density storage capacity needed to distribute digital
multimedia content.

      The next logical step, then, is to fuse these features into a
single digital package.  The all-digital document still contains text
and hypertext links, but hypertext expands into hypermedia.  The
hypermedia document contains links to not only digital text, but also
to digital graphics, digital audio clips, digital video (still)
frames and full-motion digital video, all of which are easily
combined, revised, stored, and retrieved, despite the document's
size.
The Problem

      In spite of these developments, softcopy documentation is not
nearly as advanced as it could be.  Softcopy providers must take
better advantage of the possibilities that arise when the paper page
is eliminated; they must exploit the computer terminal and all its
potential to make electronic documents easy to use.

      Imbedded graphics often make excellent textual aids, but
wouldn't imbedded digital video clips be even better? The user could
see a job being performed, and hear further explanation.  Still
photos can show exactly what a piece of equipment looks like.
Animated graphics could illustrate concepts that are not easily
communicated by a written description.  For example, authors could
use figures and moving arrows to illustrate the flow of data within a
computer network while...